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Rogers Stirk Harbour + Partners

Marseille Provence airport is located between Marseille and Aix-en-Provence on an inland lake which was the site of the first flight by a flying boat.

Between 1934 and the 1980s, the airport was progressively developed on a piecemeal basis to meet short-term requirements. By 1988, with 4 million passengers a year, the projected rate of expansion in air traffic was such that a long-term strategy was necessary.

Richard Rogers Partnership, in conjunction with Atelier 9/ETA, undertook a study to provide a development plan for an area of 16,000m² that would permit expansion up to 15 million passengers a year. The first phase of this scheme was completed in 1992, creating at the centre of the development the main check in area and administrative heart of the airport covered by large lightweight parasol structures that appear to float over the surrounding building. Once through security, passengers have a chance to orientate themselves with splendid views over the airport and surrounding hills. This linear arrangement – with arrivals and departures separated on two levels – assures great clarity and visibility of the airport functions, but also allows for future expansion. With a second terminal completed in 2006, the airport is now France’s fourth busiest passenger hub.

Marseille Provence airport is located between Marseille and Aix-en-Provence on an inland lake which was the site of the first flight by a flying boat.

Between 1934 and the 1980s, the airport was progressively developed on a piecemeal basis to meet short-term requirements. By 1988, with 4 million passengers a year, the projected rate of expansion in air traffic was such that a long-term strategy was necessary.

Richard Rogers Partnership, in conjunction with Atelier 9/ETA, undertook a study to provide a development plan for an area of 16,000m² that would permit expansion up to 15 million passengers a year. The first phase of this scheme was completed in 1992, creating at the centre of the development the main check in area and administrative heart of the airport covered by large lightweight parasol structures that appear to float over the surrounding building. Once through security, passengers have a chance to orientate themselves with splendid views over the airport and surrounding hills. This linear arrangement – with arrivals and departures separated on two levels – assures great clarity and visibility of the airport functions, but also allows for future expansion. With a second terminal completed in 2006, the airport is now France’s fourth busiest passenger hub.

Marseille Provence airport is located between Marseille and Aix-en-Provence on an inland lake which was the site of the first flight by a flying boat.

Between 1934 and the 1980s, the airport was progressively developed on a piecemeal basis to meet short-term requirements. By 1988, with 4 million passengers a year, the projected rate of expansion in air traffic was such that a long-term strategy was necessary.

Richard Rogers Partnership, in conjunction with Atelier 9/ETA, undertook a study to provide a development plan for an area of 16,000m² that would permit expansion up to 15 million passengers a year. The first phase of this scheme was completed in 1992, creating at the centre of the development the main check in area and administrative heart of the airport covered by large lightweight parasol structures that appear to float over the surrounding building. Once through security, passengers have a chance to orientate themselves with splendid views over the airport and surrounding hills. This linear arrangement – with arrivals and departures separated on two levels – assures great clarity and visibility of the airport functions, but also allows for future expansion. With a second terminal completed in 2006, the airport is now France’s fourth busiest passenger hub.

Marseille Provence airport is located between Marseille and Aix-en-Provence on an inland lake which was the site of the first flight by a flying boat.

Between 1934 and the 1980s, the airport was progressively developed on a piecemeal basis to meet short-term requirements. By 1988, with 4 million passengers a year, the projected rate of expansion in air traffic was such that a long-term strategy was necessary.

Richard Rogers Partnership, in conjunction with Atelier 9/ETA, undertook a study to provide a development plan for an area of 16,000m² that would permit expansion up to 15 million passengers a year. The first phase of this scheme was completed in 1992, creating at the centre of the development the main check in area and administrative heart of the airport covered by large lightweight parasol structures that appear to float over the surrounding building. Once through security, passengers have a chance to orientate themselves with splendid views over the airport and surrounding hills. This linear arrangement – with arrivals and departures separated on two levels – assures great clarity and visibility of the airport functions, but also allows for future expansion. With a second terminal completed in 2006, the airport is now France’s fourth busiest passenger hub.

Key Facts

Show Team

Team

Peter Barber
Pierre Botschi
Tim Colquhoun
MikeDavies
Pascale Gibon
Marco Goldschmeid

Lennart Grut
Enrique Hermosa-Lera
Oliver Kühn
Swantje Kühn
Michael McNamara
Andrew Partridge

Gregoris Patsalosavvis
Kim Quazi
Richard Rogers
John Smith
John Young

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Date
1989-1992

Client
Aéroport Marseille Provence

Location
Marseilles, France

Construction Cost
142,500,000 (FF)

Gross Floor Area
16 000 m²

Structural Engineer
Waterman Partnership

Services Engineer
Hulley & Kirkwood Consulting Engineers

Contractor
Bovis Construction Ltd

Acoustic Consultant
Sandy Brown Associates

Specification Consultant
Schumann Smith