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Rogers Stirk Harbour + Partners

“Rogers' plan is rooted firmly in the modern world. But it is also informed by consideration for a whole series of principles that should gladden the hearts of the most herbivorous. It is based on a high-minded attempt to create a mixed slice of city, that does not die at six, that is shaped to minimise energy use, that will allow the maximum use of public transport.”

Deyan Sudjic, The Guardian, 2 February 1992

No city has gone through a more extreme period of growth and change in the last two decades than Shanghai. In that time it has gone from a city of low rise buildings and densely packed housing, crowded behind the historic European classical buildings of the Bund, to the skyscraper-studded skyline of the present.

The city authorities identified the Pudong area as a new financial district. The mayor authorised the removal of the shipyards and heavy industries that once occupied the area, and created a virtual free fire zone for development. At the same time, the city invited proposals from a group of architects from around the world, including RSHP’s team to put forward ideas for a masterplan to guide the redevelopment of Pudong, The brief was to propose ideas for major development in an area supporting 800,000 people. The practice’s response applies the principles of a sustainable compact city, to create ‘a diverse commercial and residential quarter enhanced by a network of parks and public spaces’. A park forms the core of the district, with boulevards radiating outwards from it, and public transport nodes forming a ring around it.

These light rail nodes are linked to new pedestrian and cycle routes, and are the drivers of urban form: higher density high-rise development is clustered around these nodes to form six neighbourhoods. Commercial and residential areas are located within walking distance of each other and are also close to other infrastructure.

“Rogers' plan is rooted firmly in the modern world. But it is also informed by consideration for a whole series of principles that should gladden the hearts of the most herbivorous. It is based on a high-minded attempt to create a mixed slice of city, that does not die at six, that is shaped to minimise energy use, that will allow the maximum use of public transport.”

Deyan Sudjic, The Guardian, 2 February 1992

No city has gone through a more extreme period of growth and change in the last two decades than Shanghai. In that time it has gone from a city of low rise buildings and densely packed housing, crowded behind the historic European classical buildings of the Bund, to the skyscraper-studded skyline of the present.

The city authorities identified the Pudong area as a new financial district. The mayor authorised the removal of the shipyards and heavy industries that once occupied the area, and created a virtual free fire zone for development. At the same time, the city invited proposals from a group of architects from around the world, including RSHP’s team to put forward ideas for a masterplan to guide the redevelopment of Pudong, The brief was to propose ideas for major development in an area supporting 800,000 people. The practice’s response applies the principles of a sustainable compact city, to create ‘a diverse commercial and residential quarter enhanced by a network of parks and public spaces’. A park forms the core of the district, with boulevards radiating outwards from it, and public transport nodes forming a ring around it.

These light rail nodes are linked to new pedestrian and cycle routes, and are the drivers of urban form: higher density high-rise development is clustered around these nodes to form six neighbourhoods. Commercial and residential areas are located within walking distance of each other and are also close to other infrastructure.

“Rogers' plan is rooted firmly in the modern world. But it is also informed by consideration for a whole series of principles that should gladden the hearts of the most herbivorous. It is based on a high-minded attempt to create a mixed slice of city, that does not die at six, that is shaped to minimise energy use, that will allow the maximum use of public transport.”

Deyan Sudjic, The Guardian, 2 February 1992

No city has gone through a more extreme period of growth and change in the last two decades than Shanghai. In that time it has gone from a city of low rise buildings and densely packed housing, crowded behind the historic European classical buildings of the Bund, to the skyscraper-studded skyline of the present.

The city authorities identified the Pudong area as a new financial district. The mayor authorised the removal of the shipyards and heavy industries that once occupied the area, and created a virtual free fire zone for development. At the same time, the city invited proposals from a group of architects from around the world, including RSHP’s team to put forward ideas for a masterplan to guide the redevelopment of Pudong, The brief was to propose ideas for major development in an area supporting 800,000 people. The practice’s response applies the principles of a sustainable compact city, to create ‘a diverse commercial and residential quarter enhanced by a network of parks and public spaces’. A park forms the core of the district, with boulevards radiating outwards from it, and public transport nodes forming a ring around it.

These light rail nodes are linked to new pedestrian and cycle routes, and are the drivers of urban form: higher density high-rise development is clustered around these nodes to form six neighbourhoods. Commercial and residential areas are located within walking distance of each other and are also close to other infrastructure.

“Rogers' plan is rooted firmly in the modern world. But it is also informed by consideration for a whole series of principles that should gladden the hearts of the most herbivorous. It is based on a high-minded attempt to create a mixed slice of city, that does not die at six, that is shaped to minimise energy use, that will allow the maximum use of public transport.”

Deyan Sudjic, The Guardian, 2 February 1992

No city has gone through a more extreme period of growth and change in the last two decades than Shanghai. In that time it has gone from a city of low rise buildings and densely packed housing, crowded behind the historic European classical buildings of the Bund, to the skyscraper-studded skyline of the present.

The city authorities identified the Pudong area as a new financial district. The mayor authorised the removal of the shipyards and heavy industries that once occupied the area, and created a virtual free fire zone for development. At the same time, the city invited proposals from a group of architects from around the world, including RSHP’s team to put forward ideas for a masterplan to guide the redevelopment of Pudong, The brief was to propose ideas for major development in an area supporting 800,000 people. The practice’s response applies the principles of a sustainable compact city, to create ‘a diverse commercial and residential quarter enhanced by a network of parks and public spaces’. A park forms the core of the district, with boulevards radiating outwards from it, and public transport nodes forming a ring around it.

These light rail nodes are linked to new pedestrian and cycle routes, and are the drivers of urban form: higher density high-rise development is clustered around these nodes to form six neighbourhoods. Commercial and residential areas are located within walking distance of each other and are also close to other infrastructure.

Key Facts

Show Team

Team

Laurie Abbott
Hal Currey
Mike Davies

Marco Goldschmied
Richard Rogers
Simon Smithson

Andrew Wright
John Young

Hide Team

Date
1992-1994

Client
Pudong Development Office of Shanghai Municipality

Architect
Richard Rogers Partnership

Location
Shanghai, China

Site Area
40 000 000 m²

Services Engineer
Ove Arup & Partners / Battle McCarthy