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Rogers Stirk Harbour + Partners

Wembley has always had a unique place in the UK’s history, hosting national events such as the British Empire Exhibition in 1924/5, the Olympics in 1948 and the World Cup Final in 1966. With the construction of the new stadium in 2007, the need for a wider masterplan became critical.

The practice’s Wembley Masterplan covers 42 acres of land identified in the Mayor of London’s 2004 London Plan as an opportunity area. It is a plan for a modern, urban, people’s place with the National Stadium as its centrepiece. The plan for Wembley offers high quality, state of the art leisure, business and retail facilities, as well as a centre for work with a wide range of job opportunities. It takes advantage of the economic opportunities brought by the Stadium and the refurbished Arena and also integrates the new development with the existing town centre and surrounding community.

Key to the scheme is the creation of a major new public route from Wembley Central Station to the Stadium and then beyond to Wembley Park Station. An important new destination on this route is Arena Square, bounded to the southeast by a new hotel and the Palace of Industry. Arena Square provides a dramatic setting for seasonal and cultural events. Intended to be in continuous use, it is a cosmopolitan place enlivened by public art, street performances and carnivals. The masterplan reinvigorates Wembley as a vibrant place during the day as well as in the evening.

The masterplan was intended to create 7,000 jobs, homes for 8,500 people including 40% affordable housing and to give over 60 percent of the site to public space, including a new boulevard on the scale of Regent’s Street, complete with restaurants, bars, leisure facilities, hotels and retail amenities.

Wembley has always had a unique place in the UK’s history, hosting national events such as the British Empire Exhibition in 1924/5, the Olympics in 1948 and the World Cup Final in 1966. With the construction of the new stadium in 2007, the need for a wider masterplan became critical.

The practice’s Wembley Masterplan covers 42 acres of land identified in the Mayor of London’s 2004 London Plan as an opportunity area. It is a plan for a modern, urban, people’s place with the National Stadium as its centrepiece. The plan for Wembley offers high quality, state of the art leisure, business and retail facilities, as well as a centre for work with a wide range of job opportunities. It takes advantage of the economic opportunities brought by the Stadium and the refurbished Arena and also integrates the new development with the existing town centre and surrounding community.

Key to the scheme is the creation of a major new public route from Wembley Central Station to the Stadium and then beyond to Wembley Park Station. An important new destination on this route is Arena Square, bounded to the southeast by a new hotel and the Palace of Industry. Arena Square provides a dramatic setting for seasonal and cultural events. Intended to be in continuous use, it is a cosmopolitan place enlivened by public art, street performances and carnivals. The masterplan reinvigorates Wembley as a vibrant place during the day as well as in the evening.

The masterplan was intended to create 7,000 jobs, homes for 8,500 people including 40% affordable housing and to give over 60 percent of the site to public space, including a new boulevard on the scale of Regent’s Street, complete with restaurants, bars, leisure facilities, hotels and retail amenities.

Wembley has always had a unique place in the UK’s history, hosting national events such as the British Empire Exhibition in 1924/5, the Olympics in 1948 and the World Cup Final in 1966. With the construction of the new stadium in 2007, the need for a wider masterplan became critical.

The practice’s Wembley Masterplan covers 42 acres of land identified in the Mayor of London’s 2004 London Plan as an opportunity area. It is a plan for a modern, urban, people’s place with the National Stadium as its centrepiece. The plan for Wembley offers high quality, state of the art leisure, business and retail facilities, as well as a centre for work with a wide range of job opportunities. It takes advantage of the economic opportunities brought by the Stadium and the refurbished Arena and also integrates the new development with the existing town centre and surrounding community.

Key to the scheme is the creation of a major new public route from Wembley Central Station to the Stadium and then beyond to Wembley Park Station. An important new destination on this route is Arena Square, bounded to the southeast by a new hotel and the Palace of Industry. Arena Square provides a dramatic setting for seasonal and cultural events. Intended to be in continuous use, it is a cosmopolitan place enlivened by public art, street performances and carnivals. The masterplan reinvigorates Wembley as a vibrant place during the day as well as in the evening.

The masterplan was intended to create 7,000 jobs, homes for 8,500 people including 40% affordable housing and to give over 60 percent of the site to public space, including a new boulevard on the scale of Regent’s Street, complete with restaurants, bars, leisure facilities, hotels and retail amenities.

Wembley has always had a unique place in the UK’s history, hosting national events such as the British Empire Exhibition in 1924/5, the Olympics in 1948 and the World Cup Final in 1966. With the construction of the new stadium in 2007, the need for a wider masterplan became critical.

The practice’s Wembley Masterplan covers 42 acres of land identified in the Mayor of London’s 2004 London Plan as an opportunity area. It is a plan for a modern, urban, people’s place with the National Stadium as its centrepiece. The plan for Wembley offers high quality, state of the art leisure, business and retail facilities, as well as a centre for work with a wide range of job opportunities. It takes advantage of the economic opportunities brought by the Stadium and the refurbished Arena and also integrates the new development with the existing town centre and surrounding community.

Key to the scheme is the creation of a major new public route from Wembley Central Station to the Stadium and then beyond to Wembley Park Station. An important new destination on this route is Arena Square, bounded to the southeast by a new hotel and the Palace of Industry. Arena Square provides a dramatic setting for seasonal and cultural events. Intended to be in continuous use, it is a cosmopolitan place enlivened by public art, street performances and carnivals. The masterplan reinvigorates Wembley as a vibrant place during the day as well as in the evening.

The masterplan was intended to create 7,000 jobs, homes for 8,500 people including 40% affordable housing and to give over 60 percent of the site to public space, including a new boulevard on the scale of Regent’s Street, complete with restaurants, bars, leisure facilities, hotels and retail amenities.

Key Facts

Show Team

Team

Benjamin Darras
Philip Dennis
Mike Fairbrass
Tim Mason

Jon Mercer
Andrew Morris
Leonardo Pelleriti
Richard Rogers

Angela Tobin
Martin White
Elizabeth Young

Hide Team

Date
2003-2006

Client
Quintain plc

Location
London, UK

Construction Cost
£6,000,000

Site Area
42 acres

Gross Area
493,000m2

Structural Engineer
Buro Happold

Services Engineer
Buro Happold

Quantity Surveyor
EC Harris

Project Manager
RPS Consultants

Landscape Architect
Randle Siddeley

Planning Consultant
Gerald Eve / RPS Consultants

Civil Engineer
Buro Happold

Transport Engineer
Buro Happold